Poems My Grandmother Taught Me

I’ve Had It!

He says in his job
He has many frustrations,
Things that go wrong,
And aggravations.

So he comes home from work
Filled up to here,
And since I’m the one
Who brings up the rear,

He always proceeds
To let it all out,
On and on he goes,
‘Til I’m ready to shout!

I wish I could find me
A wailing wall,
I’d have it put
Right here in the hall.

Then I’d tell him each night
When he starts to explode,
There’s the wall, be my guest,
Stand there and unload.

Cry your heart out, scream,
Kick, throw a fit,
But use the wall,
I’M TIRED OF IT!

~Dana B. Nelson

Poems My Grandmother Taught Me

Our Choice

Marriage is heaven, or it can be hell.
What will ours be? How can we tell?

The answer is ours to make,
Because from the start,
We’ll make our love grow or turn
Ice cold in the heart.
We are the two who’ll decide
Which trend it will take,
Either heaven on earth,
Or a hell we’ll make.

So let’s be kind and thoughtful,
Unselfish and forgiving,
Forget our little faults
As we share living.

Since we love each other so tenderly,
Let’s treat it very sacredly.
Love is a flower to be watered each day,
Faithfully, or it withers away!

~Dana B. Nelson

Poems My Grandmother Taught Me

There WAS Something Missing

The parting was so simple, just a closing of the door,
After one last lingering look to see if everything I’d done
Was just exactly as you would like it. The footstool by your chair,
Your ashtray near, and I put fresh flowers on the table there.
In the kitchen was a cake I baked, I made your favorite one.
When you came in, the house was like it had always been before.

I have wondered since,
If wonder I dare,
When did you notice
I wasn’t there?

~Dana B. Nelson

Poems My Grandmother Taught Me

The Sugar Pill

The doctor’s waiting room was filled —
With only standing room.
Pills for this, pills for that —
Chase the ladies’ gloom!

Women, women, women,
Crowded in the hall —
Was there no end to it,
No end at all?

Way down deep inside,
This wise doctor knew,
That to cure the many ills,
What he ought to do,

Was call each husband in,
Stand there and say,
Tell her that you love her,
Tell her three times a day!

~Dana B. Nelson

Poems My Grandmother Taught Me

Substitution

Oh, tell me not that I am cold, aloof.
It is the only shield that I can wear.
The gay, sweet laughter, badge of all of youth,
Is gone, with only numbness there.
How can it be? The lovely things we planned
Slipping through my fingers. As they go,
My life seem like a sieve that’s sifting sand.
And now in such a quiet way I know
Peace comes to those who seek and wait.
A still and lonely peace all shorn of hate.

~Dana B. Nelson

Poems My Grandmother Taught Me

Found Wanting

I saw a flower on a summer day
Wilting and dying for lack of rain.
Just a quiet shower would have surely brought
All of its loveliness back again.

Why did I suddenly want to cry?
Was it because that, likewise, I
Needed a shower of love to revive
My joy of living and being alive?

(Darling, what makes you unable to see
What a little love would do for me?)

~Dana B. Nelson

Poems My Grandmother Taught Me

Positive, Negative, Oil and Fire

What was our trouble? Now it is clear
Why we had to let go of all we held dear.
I loved to climb mountains while you were secure
Down in the valley, safe and sure.
I reached for the stars while you were content
To see stars in puddles when the rain was spent.
Anything routine I tried to avoid,
While the unexpected found you annoyed.
For things worthwhile I’d gamble, while you
Were satisfied with the tried and true.
I’m a born optimist, (you always said),
While you were a pessimist, born and bred.
I’d wipe up the spilled milk and go on my way,
You brooded about it day after day.
Positive, negative, oil and fire,
Mix together — results are dire.

And so with experience wisdom came.
Though the fire burned brightly we put out the flame.

~Dana B. Nelson